Gameplay 2
Controls 2
Graphics & Audio 4
Value For Money 3
Longevity 2

NOT ENOUGH HEALTH POTION SIMULATOR: Yes, published by Digetari and developed by Anthony Case/Stage Clear Studios comes the exhilaratingly difficult action adventure shooter, Skelly Selest. Enter the realm of hell itself and experience foes more frightening than one can ever dream of. How many points can you earn by killing hell’s demons? Do you have ..

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Skelly Selest Xbox One Review

NOT ENOUGH HEALTH POTION SIMULATOR:

Yes, published by Digetari and developed by Anthony Case/Stage Clear Studios comes the exhilaratingly difficult action adventure shooter, Skelly Selest. Enter the realm of hell itself and experience foes more frightening than one can ever dream of. How many points can you earn by killing hell’s demons? Do you have what it takes? You have the rest of eternity to prove it… 

Before you even start playing Skelly Selest, you’ll notice how retro the whole game feels. From the arcade like visuals, to the CRT screen effects to the 8-bit music, the entire game makes you feel like you should be inserting a few coins in before playing.

Skelly Selest has a great soundtrack, and one that sounds very reminiscent of that of an old arcade game. There’s a great selection of tunes to listen to, however it does start to get repetitive after a while.

Before you start playing, you’ll want to first complete the tutorial. This way you can learn about all 3 of the different controls you need to remember. “X” or “Y” is used to dash, “A” or “LT” is used to trigger the melee attack and “B” or “RT” is used for firing your gun. Overall, the controls don’t seem too bad, but after a while of playing, they aren’t the best. You really change them all that much but you can make some real tweaks to them that really do make a difference. After playing the majority of my playthrough with the “RS” analogue stick off, I decided to switch it to the axe ability. This small change made my playthrough a hundred times easier, granted it was still tough as balls, but hey ho.

When you’ve finished the tutorial mode, you’ll be at a loss for words at what game mode to choose, as there are quite a number of them. Different modes unlock after certain requirements, and so push you do get certain objectives while you play through the game. The three base game modes are Lichemancer Hunt, Necrotic Colosseum and Dungeon Pilgrimage.  

Lichemancer Hunt is essentially wave mode with bosses and I think Necrotic Colosseum is the same but without bosses? I didn’t live long enough to see the difference, but both were equally as hard to beat, hence why my Dungeon Pilgrimage was my favourite game mode.

Dungeon Pilgrimage was I thought was your bog standard dungeon explorer, hack and slash and treasures etc. But I was quite surprised. I mean, it is but…it isn’t. After playing through dungeon pilgrimage, you’d think you’d have a good idea at the map right? Know your way around? Well, you’ll be surprised to know that each dungeon is procedurally generated, meaning that every dungeon you enter is unique to itself. You’ll never know what’s on the other side of the door and so every opportunity is a risk.

That said, any number of enemies could be behind a door at any given point. There are a lot of enemies in Skelly Selest. There’s so many, there’s a whole beastiary listing the different types of creatures you’ll find in the game, during which I only discovered half. Every mob you encounter, you’ll have to find a different way at defeating them, which can be quite the task. You will die a lot in this game, just a heads up.

Combat in Skelly Selest was mixed for me. After making the change to the controls, the game was a lot easier to play, but with default controls, the game felt very clunky. Extremely clunky, so much so that it was near impossible to play. Death was around every corner and I was just fed up by it. Making the change in controls however, made the game so much easier and my performance went up. Using the gun seemed to be more of a challenge than an asset to me, so I seldom used it, only shooting during moments of intense action.

The one thing you have to keep your eye on and that’s your health. You only have 5 hearts when you start the game, this can be increased by finding pickups, but these pickups aren’t common. There are many different pickups in the game and not all of them will be health boosts, that’s the issue. There is a clear lack of these health pickups and there come few and far between, meaning you really need to watch your ass when your playing. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve died in Skelly Selest but I know it’s more than I’d care to admit.

Overall, Skelly Selest was a mixed experience. Up until I changed the control scheme, I would not have enjoyed this game at all. The control scheme really makes or breaks a game, though seldom we think about it. After making a few adjustments, the game really started to pick up the pace, while still a challenge, the game was a lot easier than before. The soundtrack was really ace, although I did have to turn it off after a while of gameplay, but if it weren’t for the fact that I kept dying while listening to the music, I probably would have kept it on. The tunes you’ll hear in the game are pretty good, it’s just that they get a little repetitive after a while. For older arcade players, I would definitely recommend this game too as the visuals and sounds all give a nostalgic feel to an era long gone. Newer players however, may struggle, this game is quite difficult and would recommend something else.

Developed by: Anthony Case/Stage Clear Studios Twitter: @stagecs

Published by: Digerati  Twitter: @DigeratiDM

Price –  £8.39

 

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