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Graphics & Audio 3
Value For Money 3
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BE YOU ANGELS? NAY…WE ARE BUT MEN Developed and published by Robot Riot from the original Bitmap Brothers, comes Gods Remastered: the classical platform puzzle action game which has been specially digitized to a HD 3D experience. With ability to switch between the old pixel graphics and the new and improved graphics, it’s definitely worth ..

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Gods Remastered Xbox One Review

BE YOU ANGELS? NAY…WE ARE BUT MEN

Developed and published by Robot Riot from the original Bitmap Brothers, comes Gods Remastered: the classical platform puzzle action game which has been specially digitized to a HD 3D experience. With ability to switch between the old pixel graphics and the new and improved graphics, it’s definitely worth a revisit if you’re up for a nostalgia trip.

Begin your quest to slay the Great Guardians who threaten and have stolen the homes of the gods. Will you live up to the challenge? Is there any hope in humanity left? All that stands in the way is you and your throwing knives.

Gods was originally released in 1991, well before my time. The original game was released on devices such as the SNES, the Atari ST and the Acorn Archimedes to name a few. Gods was praised on it’s release as being ingenuitive with it’s AI design, adapting and changing depending on the player’s skill. But does it feel the same all these years later? Let’s find out.

The first thing you’ll notice about Gods Remastered is the change in graphics. If you played this game when it first came out, this will be quite the shock for you. With decent high definition graphics and textures, I’d imagine any returning player will have a field day with this. While the graphics aren’t as pristine as some of the bigger titles released this year, it does serve the original game well. Trying to be as true to the original as it can be, I think they’ve done a good job at replicating the experience.

For anyone who didn’t get a chance to play the original game, Gods Remastered has a mechanic in which you can switch between the graphics. Much like what Halo Combat Evolved Anniversary did, you can switch between the two states in real-time. This allows new players to see just how much of a change the new graphics are, over the original.

A hilarious but unfortunate change comes from the original graphics. I didn’t notice it at first, but if you get your character to climb up a set of ladders, the bum cheeks seem to have an animation of their own. They seem to wiggle as you put one foot on top of the other, a feature sadly not present in the new graphics.

Gameplay wise, Gods is hard. Not like a bit hard, but very hard. Personally, I’d say Gods is just a few tiers down from Dark Souls. There are a plethora of different enemies you will encounter, from weird cyclops minions to flying gargoyles: they all have different strengths and weaknesses and you have to be light on your toes when fighting them.

Combat is like what you’d expect from a platformer: attempt to land attacks while dodging incoming projectiles and hopefully if you do this long enough, the enemy will die. Sometimes you’re forced to fend off airborne creatures, which opt for an aerial assault, jumping into the air throwing your knives gung-ho style. There are a number of pickups you can use which will enhance your firepower, including the likes of an energy ball which can pretty much one hit anything in its path.  

On top of the deadly enemies, the level design is also treacherous. Do not be fooled by a the first lever you see, you may find out that it will serious infringe upon your gameplay afterwards, and so you have to be cautious. Such levers I only found out after trial and error, when I kept dying after trying to finish the level, I didn’t pull this one lever and the statues that shot fire at me where no longer there.

It’s this type of puzzle aspect that really makes you think “Should I do that? Or Should I try this?” Gods is a game where you have the freedom to trial and error, granted you might die a few times, or a lot of times.

I found the game quite clunky. I can definitely see this working well with a joystick, but for controllers, the controls are just a little off. When you jump, or move your character you can definitely feel a slight input delay, only very minutely, but it makes a big impact. The amount of times I’ve jumped to platforms with the firm belief of landing, only to fall short and die horrifically, are quite common.

The noises your character makes though are spot on. Half the time he sounds like Arnold Schwarzenegger, the other half it’s Russell Crowe and it’s really quite funny to hear some of the noises he makes. The new soundtrack for the game, another addition to the new and improved graphics, I unfortunately disliked and had to turn off during my playthrough.

Although, I did prefer the sounds of the original game. Nothing can quite beat the old sound effects of the arcade era.

Overall, I found Gods Remastered to be a skillfully challenging experience. For those who had the chance to play this when it first came out, this will be a nostalgic visit down memory lane, but with a HD twist. The new graphics are not amazing, but do well to accurately imitate the feel of the original game. The controls feel a little clunky and the puzzles and enemies do take a fair amount of time to beat, but that’s what the puzzle platformer is all about. For new players, I’d recommend you give it a go, but just note that a lot has changed since this game was first released. Some of the new innovations that this game was originally praised for, like the AI that adapts to your play style, is readily available in most games of today. I feel that, including myself, most new players won’t come to appreciate how much of a difference this was. While not the best platformer out there, Gods Remastered certainly isn’t the worst, and for anyone looking for a  challenging mythical action adventure, look no further.

We’d like to thank Robot Riot for providing us with the game code

Published and Developed by: Robot Riot Twitter:@RobotRiotGames

Price – £16.74

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